Eggs have gotten such a bad rap, and if you incorporate them into a healthy diet plan, there's nothing wrong with adding eggs to your diet. Which leads us to the nutritional part of the equation - what are the calories in an egg?

We went to the American Egg Council to get the scoop on eggs and here's what they said:
Eggs are incredible when it comes to nutrition.

Eggs are all-natural, and one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals—all for 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more. At less than 15 cents apiece, eggs are an affordable and delicious breakfast option.

The protein in eggs is the highest-quality protein found in any food. The high-quality protein in eggs provides the energy families need to perform their best on important days.
Nutrient-rich, all-natural eggs are a welcome addition to any diet.

The nutrient package of eggs aids in the following:

Weight management: The high-quality protein in eggs helps you to feel fuller longer and stay energized, which contributes to maintaining a healthy weight.
Muscle strength and muscle-loss prevention: Research indicates that high-quality protein may help active adults build muscle strength and help prevent muscle loss in middle-aged and aging adults.
Healthy pregnancy: Egg yolks are an excellent source of choline, an essential nutrient that contributes to fetal brain development and helps prevent birth defects. Two eggs provide about 250 milligrams of choline, or roughly half of the recommended daily intake for pregnant and breastfeeding women.
Brain function: Choline also aids the brain function of adults by maintaining the structure of brain cell membranes, and is a key component of the neuro-transmitter that helps relay messages from the brain through nerves to the muscles.
Eye health: Lutein and zeaxanthin, two antioxidants found in egg yolks, help prevent macular degeneration, a leading cause of age-related blindness. Though eggs contain a small amount of these two nutrients, research shows that the lutein from eggs may be more bioavailable than lutein from other food sources.

So there you have it, a good part of a diet, low in calories and packed with nutrition.

 

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